Technology 2017-12-01T15:15:13+00:00

Haptics is the science and technology of touch. Our patented¹ microfluidic technology lets you feel the shape, movement, texture, and temperature of digital objects—taking haptic feedback to a new level. It can be integrated into any garment—from gloves to a full-body suit—to deliver unprecedented realism in virtual experiences.

¹US 9,652,037; additional patents pending worldwide

A complex problem,
a multi-disciplinary approach

HaptX’s multidisciplinary team includes mechanical, software, electrical, and biomedical engineers. The engineering team is applying novel tools and methodologies to pioneer a new approach to haptics and crack the toughest problems in human-machine interaction.

Microfluidic smart textile

Our flexible, silicone-based smart textile contains an array of high-displacement pneumatic actuators and embedded microfluidic air channels. The actuators provide haptic feedback by pushing against the user’s skin, displacing it the same way a real object would when touched. High-performance, miniature valves accurately control the pressure of each actuator to create a virtually infinite variety of sensations—texture, size, shape, movement, and more. An optional second layer of microchannels can add temperature feedback by delivering variations of hot and cold water.

HaptX’s smart textile technology sets a new benchmark for haptic feedback performance. It delivers an unprecedented combination of high actuator density, displacement, and bandwidth in an incredibly light and thin package.

HaptX can produce actuator arrays of almost any shape and density, with a thickness of less than two millimeters. HaptX can integrate its microfluidic technology into a variety of textile and wearable products.

Gloves are just the beginning.

HaptX’s smart textile technology sets a new benchmark for haptic feedback performance. It delivers an unprecedented combination of high actuator density, displacement, and bandwidth in an incredibly light and thin package.

HaptX can produce actuator arrays of almost any shape and density, with a thickness of less than two millimeters. HaptX can integrate its microfluidic technology into a variety of textile and wearable products.

Gloves are just the beginning.

Lightweight exoskeleton

Our lightweight force-feedback exoskeleton is powered by the same microfluidic actuation technology as our skin. HaptX’s high-power-density, microfluidic actuators enable the ultra-lightweight hand exoskeleton in our HaptX Gloves to apply up to five pounds of resistance to each finger. These resistive forces complement the haptic feedback produced by the smart textile, enhancing the perception of size, shape, and weight of virtual objects.

We are actively researching scaling up the HaptX exoskeleton technology to the full body. We anticipate future products will include a large-scale exoskeleton capable of applying forces to the arms and legs.

Industrial-grade motion tracking

Industrial-grade haptics require industrial-grade motion tracking. Our software must know exactly where a user’s body is positioned in space to render convincing haptic interactions. Hands are particularly challenging because of their dexterity and small size.

HaptX’s custom magnetic motion tracking and hand simulation solution delivers sub-millimeter accuracy hand tracking with six degrees of freedom per finger and no occlusion. Our software automatically generates a physically-accurate hand model based on tracking data. No coding required.

Software development kit

The HaptX Software Development Kit (SDK) empowers developers to create touch-enabled experiences. At the heart of the HaptX SDK is a framework for physical simulation of haptic interactions.

The HaptX SDK works seamlessly with leading game engines, including Unreal Engine and Unity, making it easy for developers to create VR experiences that leverage the advanced haptic capabilities of the HaptX platform.

Our full-body future

We believe the best way to interact with the digital world is the way you interact with the real world. Your virtual hand should behave like your real hand. Your body should move like it does in the real world. Virtual objects should feel like real objects. That’s why we design every piece of our technology platform with:

  • An uncompromising dedication to the realism of the touch experience
  • An ability to scale from hands to the full body

Our mission is to bring lifelike touch to digital experiences, and we won’t stop until you can’t tell what’s real from what’s virtual.

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By | December 12th, 2017|Categories: Haptics|Comments Off on Haptics and UX Design in VR with Di Dang

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